Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Intracellular Silicate Stress-Responsive Mechanisms in the Diatom Skeletonema dohrnii.

A new interesting article has been published in Int J Mol Sci. 2019 May 23;20(10). pii: E2540. doi: 10.3390/ijms20102540. and titled:

Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Novel Insights into Intracellular Silicate Stress-Responsive Mechanisms in the Diatom Skeletonema dohrnii.

Authors of this article are:

Thangaraj S, Shang X, Sun J, Liu H,0.

A summary of the article is shown below:

Diatoms are a successful group of marine phytoplankton that often thrives under adverse environmental stress conditions. Members of the Skeletonema genus are ecologically important which may subsist during silicate stress and form a dense bloom following higher silicate concentration. However, our understanding of diatoms’ underlying molecular mechanism involved in these intracellular silicate stress-responses are limited. Here an iTRAQ-based proteomic method was coupled with multiple physiological techniques to explore distinct cellular responses associated with oxidative stress in the diatom Skeletonema dohrnii to the silicate limitation. In total, 1768 proteins were detected; 594 proteins were identified as differentially expressed (greater than a two-fold change; p < 0.05). In Si-limited cells, downregulated proteins were mainly related to photosynthesis metabolism, light-harvesting complex, and oxidative phosphorylation, corresponding to inducing oxidative stress, and ROS accumulation. None of these responses were identified in Si-limited cells; in comparing with other literature, Si-stress cells showed that ATP-limited diatoms are unable to rely on photosynthesis, which will break down and reshuffle carbon metabolism to compensate for photosynthetic carbon fixation losses. Our findings have a good correlation with earlier reports and provides a new molecular level insight into the systematic intracellular responses employed by diatoms in response to silicate stress in the marine environment.
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This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: abiotic stress; carbon fixation; diatom; iTRAQ; photosynthesis; proteomics; silicate limitation.