Science News

Cancer Survivorship and Employment: Intersection of Oral Agents, Changing Workforce Dynamics, and Employers’ Perspectives.

A new interesting article has been published in J Natl Cancer Inst. 2018 Oct 19. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djy172. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

Cancer Survivorship and Employment: Intersection of Oral Agents, Changing Workforce Dynamics, and Employers’ Perspectives.

Authors of this article are:

Bradley CJ, Brown KL, Haan M, Glasgow RE, Newman LS, Rabin B, Ritzwoller DP, Tenney L.

A summary of the article is shown below:

The ability to continue employment during and following cancer diagnosis and treatment is critical to working-age cancer survivors. Prolonged survival combined with concerns of the financial burden associated with high-cost therapies makes the mitigation of work-related consequences all the more relevant, particularly in light of recent workforce trends and evolving employment dynamics. Research that integrates the needs of survivors, employers, and the workforce is required so that advancements are made to support employed cancer survivors. In this commentary, we present four priorities for research to advance what is known about the employment effects of cancer: 1) data needed to understand the impact of emerging treatments and their influence on employment and job performance; 2) cancer survivors in the changing work environment with respect to contractual arrangements and employment in small and medium-sized firms; 3) employers’ perspectives and approaches to implementing workplace policies for cancer survivors; and 4) the development of feasible, scalable, and sustainable workplace interventions that can be implemented to address these issues. The confluence of these factors makes a strong argument for research to advance what is known and what can be done about the employment consequences of cancer.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



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