Science News

Statin use in cancer survivors versus the general population: cohort study using primary care data from the UK clinical practice research datalink.

A new interesting article has been published in BMC Cancer. 2018 Oct 22;18(1):1018. doi: 10.1186/s12885-018-4947-8. and titled:

Statin use in cancer survivors versus the general population: cohort study using primary care data from the UK clinical practice research datalink.

Authors of this article are:

Chidwick K, Strongman H, Matthews A, Stanway S, Lyon AR, Smeeth L, Bhaskaran K.

A summary of the article is shown below:

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors may be at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, but little is known about whether prescribing guidelines for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease are adequately implemented in these patients. We compared levels of statin initiation and cessation among cancer survivors compared to the general population to determine differences in uptake of pharmaceutical cardiovascular risk prevention measures in these groups.METHODS: The study population included individuals aged ≥40 during 2005-13 within the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink primary care database. Within this population we identified cancer survivors who were alive and under follow-up at least 1 year after diagnosis, and controls with no cancer history. Follow-up time prior to cancer diagnosis was included in the control cohort. Using logistic regression, we compared these groups with respect to uptake of statins within 1 month of a first high recorded cardiovascular risk score. Then, we used Cox modelling to compare persistence on statin therapy (time to statin cessation) between cancer survivors and controls from the main study population who had initiated on a statin.RESULTS: Among 4202 cancer survivors and 113,035 controls with a record indicating a high cardiovascular risk score, 23.0% and 23.5% respectively initiated a statin within 1 month (adjusted odds ratio 0.98 [91.8-1.05], p = 0.626). Cancer survivors appeared more likely to discontinue statin treatment than controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.07 [1.01-1.12], p = 0.02). This greater risk of discontinuing was only evident after the first year of therapy (p-interaction < 0.001).INTERPRETATION: Although cardiovascular risk is thought to be higher in cancer survivors compared to the general population, cancer survivors were no more likely to receive statins, and marginally more likely to cease long-term therapy, than general population controls. There may be an opportunity to mitigate the suspected higher cardiovascular risk in the growing population of cancer survivors by improving uptake of lipid-lowering treatment and persistence on therapy.
Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

Cancer survivor;Cardiovascular risk;Persistence;Primary care;Statin

.

Categories: Science News