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Moleculer dynamics simulaiton revealed reciever domain of Acinetobacter baumannii BfmR enzyme as the hot spot for future antibiotics designing.

A new interesting article has been published in J Biomol Struct Dyn. 2018 Oct 22:1-16. doi: 10.1080/07391102.2018.1498805. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

Moleculer dynamics simulaiton revealed reciever domain of Acinetobacter baumannii BfmR enzyme as the hot spot for future antibiotics designing.

Authors of this article are:

Ahmad S, Shaker B, Ahmad F, Raza S, Azam SS.

A summary of the article is shown below:

Acinetobacter baumannii is an alarming nosocomial pathogen that is resistant to multiple drugs. The pathogen is forefront of scientific attention because of high mortality and morbidity found for its complications in the past decade. As a consequence, identification of novel drug candidates and subsequent designing of novel chemical scaffolds is an imperative need of time. In the present study, we used a recently reported structure of BfmR enzyme and performed structure based virtual screening, MD simulation and binding free energies calculations. MD simulation revealed a profound movement of the best-characterized inhibitor towards the α4-β5-α5 face of the enzyme receiver domain, thus indicating its high affinity for this site compared to phosphorylation. Furthermore, it was observed that the enzyme and enzyme-inhibitor complex have high structure stability with mean RMSD of 1.2 and 1.1 Å, respectively. Binding free energy calculations for the complex unraveled high stability with MMGBSA score of -26.21 kcal/mol and MMPBSA score of -1.47 kcal/mol. Van der Waal energy was found highly favorable with value of -30.25 kcal/mol and dominated significantly the overall binding energy. Furthermore, a novel WaterSwap assay was used to circumvent the limitations of MMGB/PBSA that complements the inhibitor affinity for enzyme active pocket as depicted by the low convergence of Bennett, TI and FEP algorithms. Results yielded from this study will not only give insight into the phenomena of inhibitor movement towards the enzyme receiver domain, but will also provide a useful baseline for designing derivatives with improved biological and pharmacokinetics profiles. Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

Acinetobacter baumannii;BfmR;MD simulation;MMGB/PBSA;WaterSwap

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