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The role of 13N-ammonia in the differential diagnosis of gliomas and brain inflammatory lesions.

A new interesting article has been published in Ann Nucl Med. 2018 Oct 22. doi: 10.1007/s12149-018-1308-2. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

The role of 13N-ammonia in the differential diagnosis of gliomas and brain inflammatory lesions.

Authors of this article are:

Yi C, Shi X, Zhang X, Luo G, Zhang B, Zhang X.

A summary of the article is shown below:

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the utility of 13N-ammonia PET/CT imaging in the differential diagnosis of gliomas and brain inflammations.METHODS: 13N-ammonia PET/CT imaging data of 77 patients with gliomas and 34 patients with brain inflammations were retrospectively analyzed. No patients received any treatment before 13N-ammonia imaging. All the patients were diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy or clinical follow-up. Visual and semi-quantitative analysis was performed to analyze the results of 13N-ammonia imaging. Finally, the uptake ratios of each lesion were calculated and its differences among different groups were tested with one-way ANOVA.RESULTS: 29.4% inflammations, 51.6% low-grade gliomas and 91.3% high-grade gliomas were positive by visual analysis in 13N-ammonia imaging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the diagnosis of gliomas were 75.3%, 55.8% and 67.8%, respectively. As for semi-quantitative analysis, the T/G ratios of inflammatory lesions, low-grade gliomas and high-grade gliomas were 0.88 ± 0.24, 1.04 ± 0.43 and 1.43 ± 0.49, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed that the T/G ratios of high-grade gliomas were significantly higher than those of low-grade gliomas and inflammations (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical difference between low-grade gliomas and inflammations (P = 0.118). Among the inflammatory lesions, T/G ratios were not statistically different between infectious and demyelinating lesions (P > 0.05). ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off value of T/G ratio in distinguishing gliomas from inflammations was 1.21 with the AUC 0.78. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 52.9%, 94.4%, 65.3%, 95.7% and 45.9%, respectively. ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off value of T/G ratio in distinguishing high-grade gliomas from low-grade gliomas was 1.06 with the AUC 0.78. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 81.5%, 67.7%, 76.5%, 81.5% and 67.7%, respectively. ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off value of T/G ratio in distinguishing high-grade gliomas from low-grade gliomas and inflammations was 1.19 with the AUC 0.84. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 70.4%, 85.1%, 78.5%, 79.2% and 78.1%, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: 13 N-ammonia imaging is effective in distinguishing high-grade gliomas from low-grade gliomas and inflammations, but its role in the differential diagnosis of low-grade gliomas and brain inflammatory lesions is limited, and the accuracy needs to be improved.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

13 N-ammonia;Brain inflammation;Glioma;PET-CT

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