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Patterns and trends in the intake distribution of manufactured and homemade sugar-sweetened beverages in pre-tax Mexico, 1999-2012.

A new interesting article has been published in Public Health Nutr. 2018 Oct 23:1-11. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018002677. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

Patterns and trends in the intake distribution of manufactured and homemade sugar-sweetened beverages in pre-tax Mexico, 1999-2012.

Authors of this article are:

Aburto TC, Poti JM, Popkin BM.

A summary of the article is shown below:

OBJECTIVE: To describe trends across the intake distribution of total, manufactured and homemade sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) from 1999 to 2012, focusing on high SSB consumers and on changes by socio-economic status (SES) subgroup.DESIGN: We analysed data from one 24 h dietary recall from two nationally representative surveys. Quantile regression models at the 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles of energy intake distribution of SSB were used.SETTING: 1999 Mexican National Nutrition Survey and 2012 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey.ParticipantsSchool-aged children (5-11 years) and women (20-49 years) for trend analyses (n 7718). Population aged >1 year for 2012 (n 10 096).RESULTS: Over the 1999-2012 period, there were significant increases in the proportion of total and manufactured SSB consumers (5·7 and 10·7 percentage points), along with an increase in per-consumer SSB energy intake, resulting in significant increases in per-capita total SSB energy intake (142, 247 and 397 kJ/d (34, 59 and 95 kcal/d) in school-aged children and 155, 331 and 456 kJ/d (37, 79 and 109 kcal/d) in women at the 50th, 75th and 90th percentile, respectively). Total and manufactured SSB intakes increased sharply among low-SES children but remained similar among high-SES children during this time span.CONCLUSIONS: Large increases in SSB consumption were seen between 1999 and 2012 during this pre-tax SSB period, particularly for the highest consumers. Trends observed in school-aged children are a clear example of the nutrition transition experienced in Mexico. Policies to discourage high intake of manufactured SSB should continue, joined with strategies to encourage water and low-calorie beverage consumption.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

ENN-99;ENSANUT 2012;High consumers;Intake distribution;Mexico;Quantile regression;Sugar-sweetened beverages

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