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Managing HCV treatment failure and the potential of resistance testing in informing second line therapy options.

A new interesting article has been published in Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2018 Oct 19. doi: 10.1080/14787210.2018.1538783. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

Managing HCV treatment failure and the potential of resistance testing in informing second line therapy options.

Authors of this article are:

Loggi E, Vukotic R, Andreone P.

A summary of the article is shown below:

Direct acting antivirals have completely changed the landscape of the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The management of the few patients who relapse to a treatment with direct acting antivirals requires a careful analysis of the chances to achieve therapeutic success with a second antiviral course. In this context, the usefulness of viral resistances testing, able to detect resistance-associated substitutions in the viral sequence, is at present a matter of debate. Areas covered: The role of resistance associated substitutions is examined through the evaluation of the data from clinical trials that have assessed the impact of viral resistances on the treatment outcome. Special attention has been paid on the data from re-treatment studies. Expert commentary: The treatment failure in chronic hepatitis C is still a possible event. Therefore, additional real-world clinical data on relapse rates and on the relapse management are welcome to definitely address the clinical guidelines. At present, the testing of viral resistances is an exquisite tool for the choice of the re-treatment schedule. In the near future, widespread use of the most recently registered direct acting antivirals with high barrier to resistance will probably weaken the need of resistance testing as a support in clinical decisions.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

Chronic Hepatitis C;Direct acting antivirals;Resistance-associated substitutions;Treatment failure;Viral Resistance

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