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Incidence and types of preceding and subsequent fractures in cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome.

A new interesting article has been published in J Feline Med Surg. 2018 Oct 22:1098612X18800837. doi: 10.1177/1098612X18800837. [Epub ahead of print] and titled:

Incidence and types of preceding and subsequent fractures in cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome.

Authors of this article are:

Reyes NA, Longley M, Bailey S, Langley-Hobbs SJ.

A summary of the article is shown below:

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to document the incidence of preceding and subsequent fractures to the patellar fractures in cats with patellar fractures and dental anomaly syndrome.METHODS: Records of cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome were retrieved from the combined databases at the University of Bristol, UK, and Exclusively Cats Veterinary Hospital, USA. A request was made to complete a questionnaire to obtain long-term follow-up of these cats with respect to their current status and fractures to other bones; radiographs and histories were requested and were reviewed for treatment of ongoing fractures and outcome.RESULTS: Of the 191 cases reported with this syndrome, 92 cats (48.2%) had dental anomalies and 78 (40.8%) had fractures to other bones; 21 cats sustained the fractures preceding the patellar fractures and 57 subsequently. In total, there were 175 fractures: acetabulum (25%), tibia (22%), ischium (15.4%), humeral condyle (13.7%), calcaneus (5.1%), ilium (5.1%), pubis (3.4%) and other bones (10.2%). The majority of these fractures were characteristic of insufficiency (stress) fractures with a very similar configuration in each bone.CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: A high proportion of cats with patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome will have preceding or subsequent fractures to their patellar fractures. In this study, >10% of cats suffered characteristic fractures preceding the patellar fractures. The presence of these fractures should alert the veterinarian to the possibility that the cat is affected by patellar fracture and dental anomaly syndrome.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as:

Patellar fracture;insufficiency fracture;osteopetrosis;persistent deciduous teeth;retained teeth;stress fracture

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