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Long-term monitoring and characterization of resistance to chlorfenapyr in Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from China.

A new interesting article has been published in Pest Manag Sci. 2018 Sep 25. doi: 10.1002/ps.5222. and titled:

Long-term monitoring and characterization of resistance to chlorfenapyr in Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from China.

Authors of this article are:
Wang X Wang J Cao X Wang F Yang Y Wu S Wu Y.

A summary of the article is shown below:
BACKGROUND: Plutella xylostella (L.) is a worldwide pest of crucifer crops. Chlorfenapyr has been used extensively to manage several insect pests in vegetables, including P. xylostella. In this study, 48 field populations were collected from 11 geographic locations of China from 2008 to 2017 for resistance monitoring to chlorfenapyr. Inheritance and synergism of chlorfenapyr resistance were characterised in a field-derived population.RESULTS: Compared with the susceptible SZ strain, 33 of 39 populations collected from Eastern China were susceptible or developed low levels of resistance to chlorfenapyr (< 10-fold), 5 populations developed middle levels of resistance (11- to 33-fold), and only 1 population had high level resistance (208-fold). However, 7 of 9 populations sampled from Southern China evolved 136- to 334-fold resistance. Interestingly, the dynamic of LC50 s from four continuous sampling sites (NJ, HF, JN and KS) showed a sharp increase in 2009 which implies that adults may have immigrated from chlorfenapyr-resistant regions. A highly resistant field population (GZ15) was further studied. By crossing the GZ15 and the susceptible SZ strain we showed that resistance to chlorfenapyr was autosomally inherited and incompletely dominant. Synergism bioassays revealed that metabolic detoxification might not be responsible for chlorfenapyr resistance in the GZ15 population.CONCLUSIONS: Some field populations of P. xylostella from China have evolved high levels of resistance to chlorfenapyr. Field-evolved resistance to chlorfenapyr is autosomal and dominant in the GZ15 population. These findings will provide useful information for the design of effective resistance management strategies against P. xylostella in the field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: chlorfenapyr;diamondback moth;inheritance;resistance;synergism.

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