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Immunoglobulin A nephropathy secondary to Wilson’s disease: a case report and literature review.

A new interesting article has been published in CEN Case Rep. 2018 Sep 25. doi: 10.1007/s13730-018-0365-7. and titled:

Immunoglobulin A nephropathy secondary to Wilson’s disease: a case report and literature review.

Authors of this article are:
Shimamura Y Maeda T Gocho Y Ogawa Y Tsuji K Takizawa H.

A summary of the article is shown below:
Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, and it can be associated with liver disease. However, cases of Immunoglobulin A nephropathy secondary to Wilson’s disease are very rare. A 20-year-old Japanese man presented with microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and renal dysfunction. A renal biopsy showed mesangial cell proliferation, immunoglobulin A deposition, and electron-dense deposit in the mesangial areas, all of which are consistent with Immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed liver atrophy and splenomegaly, and the diagnosis of Wilson’s disease was confirmed with decreased serum ceruloplasmin levels, increased urinary copper excretion, Kayser-Fleischer rings and copper deposition in the liver biopsy. The patient was treated successfully with trientine hydrochloride and zinc acetate and showed improvement in renal manifestations. Wilson’s disease is a rare cause of secondary Immunoglobulin A nephropathy. We recommend that Wilson’s disease should be considered the cause of secondary Immunoglobulin A nephropathy in juvenile patients with hematuria, proteinuria, and splenomegaly and suggest measuring the serum ceruloplasmin concentrations, urinary copper excretion, and evaluating Kayser-Fleischer rings in these patients.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: IgA nephropathy;Trientine hydrochloride;Wilson’s disease;Zinc acetate.

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