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Dorsal and ventral PCC switch network assignment via changes in relative functional connectivity strength to non-canonical networks.

A new interesting article has been published in Brain Connect. 2018 Sep 26. doi: 10.1089/brain.2018.0602. and titled:

Dorsal and ventral PCC switch network assignment via changes in relative functional connectivity strength to non-canonical networks.

Authors of this article are:
Fan Y Borchardt V von Düring F Leutritz AL Dietz M Herrera-Meléndez AL Bajbouj M Li M Grimm S0 Walter M.

A summary of the article is shown below:
The Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC) is often used as seed region for probing Default Mode Network (DMN) connectivity. However, there is evidence for a functional segregation between its dorsal (dPCC) and ventral (vPCC) subregions, which suggests differential involvements of d-/vPCC in regulating cognitive demands. Our paradigm included fMRI measures for baseline resting-state, affective or cognitive tasks, and post-task resting-states. We investigated the effect of task demands on intra-PCC coupling and d-/vPCC network assignment to major intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), which was estimated via edge weights of a graph network encompassing DMN, Dorsal Attention Network, and Central Executive Network (CEN). While PCC subregions were functionally coupled during both resting-state conditions and cognitive tasks, they decoupled during affective stimulation. For dPCC, functional connectivity strength (FCS) to CEN was higher than to the other two ICNs, whereas for vPCC FCS to DMN was highest. We hence defined CEN and DMN as the canonical networks at rest for dPCC and vPCC, respectively. Switching from rest to affective stimulation however induced strongest effects to relative network assignments between non-canonical networks of dorsal and ventral PCC. While vPCC showed a durable FC to DMN, dPCC played a crucial role during switches of between-network FC depending on cognitive versus affective task requirements. Our results underline that it is crucial for future seed-based FC studies to consider these two subregions separately in terms of seed location and discussion of findings. Finally, our findings highlight the functional importance of connectivity changes towards regions outside the canonical networks.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: Default mode network;Functional connectivity;Graph theory;Resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI);Resting-state networks.

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