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Decoding the neural representation of self and person knowledge with multivariate pattern analysis and data-driven approaches.

A new interesting article has been published in Wiley Interdiscip Rev Cogn Sci. 2018 Sep 26:e1482. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1482. Review and titled:

Decoding the neural representation of self and person knowledge with multivariate pattern analysis and data-driven approaches.

Authors of this article are:
Wagner DD Chavez RS Broom TW.

A summary of the article is shown below:
Multivariate pattern analysis and data-driven approaches to understand how the human brain encodes sensory information and higher level conceptual knowledge have become increasingly dominant in visual and cognitive neuroscience; however, it is only in recent years that these methods have been applied to the domain of social information processing. This review examines recent research in the field of social cognitive neuroscience focusing on how multivariate pattern analysis (e.g., pattern classification, representational similarity analysis) and data-driven methods (e.g., reverse correlation, intersubject correlation) have been used to decode and characterize high-level information about the self, other persons, and social groups. We begin with a review of what is known about how self-referential processing and person perception are represented in the medial prefrontal cortex based on conventional activation-based neuroimaging approaches. This is followed by a nontechnical overview of current multivariate pattern-based and data-driven neuroimaging methods designed to characterize and/or decode neural representations. The remainder of the review focuses on examining how these methods have been applied to the topic of self, person perception, and the perception of social groups. In this review, we highlight recent trends (e.g., analysis of social networks, decoding race and social groups, and the use of naturalistic stimuli) and discuss several theoretical challenges that arise from the application of these new methods to the question of how the brain represents knowledge about the self and others. This article is categorized under: Neuroscience > Cognition.

Check out the article’s website on Pubmed for more information:



This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: mentalizing;multivariate pattern analysis;self;social cognition;social neuroscience.

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