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Burden of leishmaniasis in Brazil and federated units, 1990-2016: Findings from Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

A new interesting article has been published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases and titled:

Burden of leishmaniasis in Brazil and federated units, 1990-2016: Findings from Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

A brief summary of the article is provided in the abstract shown below:
Author summary Leishmaniasis are diseases caused by obligatory intracellular parasites of the genus Leishmania and are transmitted to humans through the bite of female sandflies during blood repast. Untreated visceral leishmaniasis can lead to death, while cutaneous and mucocutaneous forms generally do not pose risk of death but can cause disability and permanent injury, which raises stigma and social prejudice. The Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) is a systematic and scientific effort to quantify the health loss caused by infectious and non-infectious diseases and injury and their risk factors categorized by age, sex, and geographic distribution at specific periods of time. The present article describes, for the first time, the burden of leishmaniasis in the 27 Brazilian federated units. The VL burden increased in some states in the Northeast and Southeast regions and decreased for CML in some Northern states. Understanding the burden of these diseases and their regional differences is of great relevance for the establishment of adequate and region-specific surveillance and control measures. In addition, it can help in the rational use of available resources and in decision making aimed at reducing the transmission of the parasite and the burden of this disabling and potentially lethal disease.
Check out the article’s website for more information:


This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: Leishmaniasis,Brazil,Global health,Infectious disease control,Death rates,Kala-azar,Public and occupational health,Neglected tropical diseases

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